In Brief

Most Recent Story

Is Mindfulness Really the Best Way to Reduce Worry?

By Kira M. Newman | March 28, 2017

A new study examines how different practices benefit people who worry a lot.

 
  

Past Stories

Doing Something Creative Can Boost Your Well-Being

By Jill Suttie | March 21, 2017

A new study suggests that small acts of creativity in everyday life increase our overall sense of well-being.

 

Is the Placebo Effect More Powerful Than We Think?

By Alex Shashkevich | March 16, 2017

According to a new paper, the health care industry could serve patients better by paying more attention to psychology.

 

Which Workplace Policies Help Parents the Most?

By Jill Suttie | March 14, 2017

New studies reveal how different policies affect parental well-being—and what obstacles we face in bringing them to America.

 

Do Mindful People Have a Stronger Sense of Self?

By Kira M. Newman | March 14, 2017

Mindful people might be happier because they have a better idea of who they are, suggests a new study.

 

Why Storytelling Skills Matter for African-American Kids

By Nicole Gardner-Neblett | March 9, 2017

For African-American students, storytelling skills directly predict their early reading skills.

 

How Dogs Help People Get Along Better

By Jill Suttie | March 6, 2017

A new study suggests that when dogs are around, groups are closer, more cooperative, and more trusting.

 

How to Stop Teens from Fearing Immigrants

By Jill Suttie | February 28, 2017

A new study suggests that promoting empathy and cross-group friendships in children can buffer against the negative effects of parental and peer biases.

 

What Words Do You Associate with Happiness?

By Kira M. Newman | February 27, 2017

The answer matters for your mental health.

 


When Teachers Get Mindfulness Training, Students Win

By Jill Suttie | February 23, 2017

According to a new study, training teachers in mindfulness can affect the whole climate of the classroom.

 

Can You Change Your Personality?

By Jill Suttie | February 20, 2017

A new review of many studies suggests that our personality isn't as unchangeable as we think.

 

Does Your View of Happiness Shape Your Empathy?

By Jeanette van der Lee | February 16, 2017


Do you see happiness as within your control to improve? A new study has linked this belief to empathy.

 

Suffering May Lead to Extreme Political Beliefs

By Tom Jacobs | February 9, 2017

According to a new study, experiencing adversity may contribute to politically polarized attitudes.

 

Can Meditating Together Improve Your Relationships?

By Jill Suttie | February 6, 2017

New research suggests that there are some unique social benefits to partner meditation.

 

How to Nurture Empathic Joy in Your Classroom

By Amy L. Eva | February 2, 2017

According to a new study, students perform better when teachers share in their joy.

 

How Adults Communicate Bias to Children

By Jill Suttie | January 31, 2017

A new study suggests preschoolers can "catch" prejudice from grown-ups through nonverbal behavior—and it hints at solutions.

 

Does Your Personality Predict Your Happiness?

By Kira M. Newman | January 25, 2017

According to a new study, the relationship between happiness and personality is more complex than we thought.

 

The Most (and Least) Empathic States of America

By Tom Jacobs | January 18, 2017

New research finds levels of empathy vary considerably from state to state — and living among empathic neighbors improves quality of life.

 

Can Compassion Training Help Physicians Avoid Burnout?

By Jill Suttie | January 12, 2017

A new study suggests that compassion training may buffer against the detrimental effects of high-stress medical training, particularly for those prone to depression.

 

How to Find Happiness When You Reflect on the Past Year

By Kira M. Newman | December 29, 2016

According to a new study, reminiscing about certain types of experiences could boost your well-being.

 

Why Sex Gets Better in Old Age

By Miri Forbes, Robert Krueger, Nicholas Eaton | December 22, 2016

According to a new study, our sexual priorities change as we age and that keeps our sex lives satisfying.

 

Is the Drive to Be Masculine Hurting Your Mental Health?

By Jeremy Adam Smith | December 21, 2016

A wave of studies in 2016 suggest that masculine ideals can hurt men's physical and mental health. But they also hint at a healthier aspiration for men.

 

Should We Always Look for Silver Linings?

By Kira M. Newman | December 13, 2016

According to a new study, changing your perspective may be helpful in some situations—but not others.

 

Does Self-Compassion Make You Selfish?

By Jill Suttie | December 5, 2016

A new study suggests that self-compassion makes you hold yourself to a higher standard of morality.

 

Human or Fake? You’ll Know in One Second

By Yasmin Anwar | December 1, 2016

We can be fooled by androids like Maeve in the TV show Westworld, but not so much in real life, a new study suggests.

 

Can Corporate Giving Make You More Generous?

By Elizabeth Hopper | November 28, 2016

According to a new study, generous businesses inspire individuals to give, too—thanks to one particular emotion.

 

Teens Overestimate the Bad Behavior of Peers

By Sarah W. Helms | November 25, 2016

All the cool kids aren’t doing it, says a new study. In fact, teens underestimate good behavior among their classmates.

 

How the Growth Mindset Can Increase Cooperation

By Alex Shashkevich | November 16, 2016

In a new study, researchers saw Jewish- and Palestinian-Israeli students cooperating better after a simple lesson.

 

Narcissists Finish Last

By Adam Hoffman | November 15, 2016

According to a new study, narcissists start out popular—but eventually, people see through them.

 

What Does the Way Your Mind Wanders Reveal about You?

By Yasmin Anwar | November 7, 2016

According to a new study, conditions like ADHD and anxiety may be linked to normal brain functions gone awry.

 

Can Mindfulness Help You Be More Authentic?

By Kira M. Newman | October 31, 2016

According to a new study, mindful people might be happier because they act according to their values.

 

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Greater Good Events

The Science of Burnout: What Is It, Why It Happens, and How to Avoid It
International House at UC Berkeley
April 29, 2017
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The Science of Burnout: What Is It, Why It Happens, and How to Avoid It

A day-long semiar with GGSC Science Director Emiliana Simon-Thomas, Ph.D., celebrated compassion teacher Joan Halifax, burnout expert Christina Maslach, Ph.D., and UCLA psychiatrist Elizabeth Bromley, M.D., Ph.D.


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How Pleasure Works By Paul Bloom Bloom explores a broad range of human pleasures from food to sex to religion to music. Bloom argues that human pleasure is not purely an instinctive, superficial, sensory reaction; it has a hidden depth and complexity.

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"It is a great good and a great gift, this Greater Good. I bow to you for your efforts to bring these uplifting and illuminating expressions of humanity, grounded in good science, to the attention of us all."  
Jon Kabat-Zinn

Best-selling author and founder of the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction program

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